Not here? Vote anyway: Minnesota early absentee voting is up 150%

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Minnesota absentee voting, Twin Cities Agenda

Minnesota is known for strong voter turnout – in fact, we consistently have one of the highest voter turnout rates in the country.

(Read the Star Tribune piece on that here: Minnesota had the nation’s highest voter turnout – again. Here’s one reason why)

And, apparently, that level of voter enthusiasm isn’t limited to turning up physically at the polls: Minnesota is making a case for its absentee voting reputation as well.

Absentee, but not forgotten

Absentee voting, the process that allows Minnesotans to either cast their ballots from home or at their county courthouses, is already up a whopping 150% this year from 2016. These numbers come courtesy of Minnesota Secretary of State Steve Simon.

“Vote from home absentee voting has been growing in popularity since 2013 when it was passed into law in Minnesota…”

Who couldn’t be more excited about the dramatic increase in absentee voting.

“More than halfway through the early absentee voting phase of the 2018 statewide primary election,” he said. “I am thrilled at the growth we are seeing in voter participation in all corners of Minnesota. Minnesota voters in 2018 are well on their way to maintaining our best-in-the-nation status for voter participation.”

Here are the numbers:

As of this past Thursday, July 26, a total of 29,657 voters have cast their ballots for the upcoming primary on August 14. This is up from just 11,806 in 2016, and the 9,062 people who had voted by this time in 2014, the first year absentee voting was available.

Minnesota has two senate races, and a governor’s race, taking place this year – making it a pretty important year on both sides of the aisle.

Several local businesses around the Twin Cities have joined in making sure that people get involved. SubText Bookstore, for example, has been on of the most prominent storefronts offering help with registration and voting:

Showing that civic pride is something that can, and should, expand far beyond the walls of our town halls and government buildings.

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